Cradled by nature, on the slopes of Table Mountain surrounded by expansive natural gardens, Eden Villa is a stunning, tactile family home designed by OKHA, a furniture and interior design outfit based in Cape Town. Led by designer and creative director Adam Court, the design of Eden Villa was a challenging interior project, in part, because of its mountainside location.


The homeowners, who are directors of an international shipping company and parents to two teenagers, wanted a home that embraced the natural environment with a design that would be comfortable and welcoming for their family and friends, and an aesthetic that was uncomplicated, honest and elegant, creating an Edenic retreat at the centre of the city. More specifically, they were insistent on the interior finishes and design transmitting an organic, natural warmth and texture, with an accessible level of luxury and sophistication.


As OKHA was involved in the project before building began, during the architectural design phase with Antonio Zaninovic architects Adam and his team were able to conceptualise the internal finishes and interior architecture and décor in line and in harmony with the architectural language, creating a unified aesthetic.

L shaped Monk sofa, Monk chaise, Mosaic coffee table and Lean side tables, all by OKHA


The verdant surroundings informed the internal material finishes of natural oak floors, hammered granite tiles, pressed raw concrete and slatted timber ceilings; these finishes referencing the naturally occurring elements of the property’s terrain. Even the fireplace chimney stack is clad in granite stone excavated from the property itself, as are the exterior stone-clad walls.

Read more: Discover a modern family home in Cape Town filled with art and African heritage

Noble Grey marble vanity and white walls contrast with the slatted oak timber panelling


The clients also wanted internal and external spaces that opened the property up and linked all areas cohesively, while also offering more intimate spaces by being able to close off interconnecting zones. This was achieved by removing traditional doorways between inter-leading spaces and instead using massive sliding pocket doors that could disappear into wall recesses, thereby opening up connecting zones, or conversely, creating smaller, private spaces.

This dual functionality was applied to all the main ground floor areas, including the two teenage bedrooms, allowing the kids and their friends to inhabit a section of the house while the parents (and any social gatherings) can coexist and entertain adjacently.  At other times, having all areas open and accessible creates a wonderfully unified family unit, both indoors and out.

Read More: Part art gallery, part family home, this Cape Town house offers a stylish surprise at every turn

Al fresco living option


In the open dining area, wall-to-wall windows offer elevated panoramic views of the immediate park-like surroundings and urban horizon. OKHA designed many bespoke pieces throughout the dining room including the 10-seater dining table in American oak and waxed mild steel, featuring a tapered top with the widest point spanning the middle. This design allows for greater social interaction, due to the shape of the top, so diners can converse more easily across its length. Internal finishes contrast and  complement one another, such as the oak herringbone floor which references European classicism and lies in contrast with the raw granite stone cladding and the pressed concrete ceiling. The room is further accessorised by an oak dining console, a wall-mounted Reflect Cubist mirror, a black Law and Disorder lamp and various ceramics, all designed by OKHA.

Read More: A colourful family home in Cape Town

In the foreground: Maxx armchairs. Background: OKHA table and Minotti chairs


Natural earth tones pervade the design, from the olive green Minotti chairs in the dining room to a pair of customised burnt-earth coloured Maxx armchairs in the expansive, airy lounge zone, where timber and marble-topped coffee tables are set by a muted rose-pink L-shaped Monk sofa and chaise. Pivoting the living and dining area, the glass encased fireplace, clad in rough-hewn granite rock is an inviting focal point while a geometric Himalayan wool and silk Stone #1 Rug from the OKHA Stone Rug Collection adds a softness to the floor.
The theme that runs throughout Adam’s work is the pairing of classic and progressive styles. He pushes the boundaries of shape and form through the use of explorative geometry. This is evident across the Eden villa project, turning natural objects into elegant and sophisticated objet d’art.

Styling by Pete Bermejo

Photography by Montse Garriga